Posts Tagged ‘Nephrolithiasis’

Kidney Stone: You Have to Know It Better

My True Story

I experienced suffering kidney stones two times in my life. The first one I’ve got in 1994 (when I was 28). Suddenly my urine became red and there was pain (renal colic) at waist area. I didn’t want to undertake any surgery to take out nor other measure to destroy the stone. I chose the moderate way, i.e.  to pass  the stone out of my body through urinary tract by drinking plenty of water and with the help from specific medicines formulated to ease the stone pass out of my body through  the urinary tract. Four month later, the stone with size of  one inch went out while I was urinating.

The second kidney stone attacked me 13 years later, in 2007. I got two times severe pain (renal colic)  around waist area (so pain that I felt like I would die). Based on the first experience,   I decided only applying the natural method of therapy in order to make the stone out of my body. Even though at  that time I didn’t know exactly what kind of therapy should be. I would like to tell the story  of the natural healing I’ve carried out to overcome the second time kidney stone, but  in the next special article.
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4 comments - What do you think?  Posted by JavaHealth - September 29, 2009 at 5:48 pm

Categories: Kidney Stones   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Calcium Oxalate in Renal Stone Disease

The Terminal Metabolite That Just Won’t Go Away

Summary

The incidence of kidney stone disease, particularly calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis in the US and other countries  has been increasing throughout the past three decades. Biopsy studies show that both calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis probably occur by different mechanisms in different subsets of patients. Before more-effective medical therapies can be developed for these conditions, we must understand the mechanisms governing the transport and excretion of oxalate and the interactions of the ion in general and renal physiology. Blood oxalate derives from diet, degradation of ascorbate, and production by the liver and erythrocytes. In mammals, oxalate is a terminal metabolite that must be excreted or sequestered. The kidneys are the primary route of excretion and the site of oxalate’s only known function. Oxalate stimulates the uptake of chloride, water, and sodium by the proximal tubule through the exchange of oxalate for sulfate or chloride via the solute carrier SLC26A6. Fecal excretion of oxalate is stimulated by hyperoxalemia in rodents, but no similar phenomenon has been observed in humans. Studies in which rats were treated with C-oxalate have shown that less than 2% of a chronic oxalate load accumulates in the internal organs, plasma, and skeleton. These studies have also demonstrated that there is interindividual variability in the accumulation of oxalate, especially by the kidney. This Review summarizes the transport and function of oxalate in mammalian physiology and the ion’s potential roles in nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis.

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1 comment - What do you think?  Posted by JavaHealth - September 23, 2009 at 5:51 pm

Categories: Kidney Disease   Tags: , , , , ,