Posts Tagged ‘iron’

Dietary Fiber Prevents You from Cancer, Part III

Can Fiber Cause Trouble?

( continuation of the previous article )

Scientists believe that we may be able to adapt to high-fiber diets. But this is not known for sure. It is speculation based on a handful of studies.

The effect of fiber on minerals varies among the different types. Here is what scientists think based on current knowledge:

  • Iron nutrition probably won’t be affected by eating more fiber.
  • Fiber probably will decrease absorption of zinc and copper.
  • If zinc and copper intake is good, the decrease in absorption probably will not create any problems.

Whole grains contain more zinc and copper than refined grains, so this may offset any loss of these minerals resulting from the fiber. But until we know this for a fact, I feel it’s best to take a moderate rather than extreme approach to the fiber content of your diet.

Another Mineral-Robber

Fiber is not the only substances in whole grain foods that can bind to minerals. Whole grains also contain phytic acid, which can also tie up minerals. Nutritionists also refer to phytic acid as phytate.
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3 comments - What do you think?  Posted by JavaHealth - March 17, 2010 at 6:05 am

Categories: NATUROPATHY, NUTRITION   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Minerals versus Cancer, Part III

The Best Sources of Iron

If you are concerned about your iron intake, consider some of these sources:

* Lean meats and shellfish

* Whole grain or enriched cereals

* Dried apricots, prunes, or raisins

* Nuts and wheat germ

* Dried beans and peas

* Leafy green vegetables

Liver, especially pork liver, contains large amounts of iron. But it is also rich in cholesterol. Too many of us eat too much of cholesterol-containing foods. Egg yolk has a moderate iron content; it is high in cholesterol, too.

The iron in flesh foods, called heme iron, is best absorbed by the body. Yet studies have found no more iron-deficiency anemia among vegetarians than among meat eaters.

One possible explanation is vitamin C. It enhances absorption of the iron in foods. Vegetarians often consume more vitamin C than meat-eaters. The vitamin C may compensate for the absence of meat in their diets.

A Look at Lead

Lead has long been in the headlines. Lead poisoning has occurred too frequently among children – often from eating chips of old paint that contained lead.
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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by JavaHealth - March 3, 2010 at 5:17 pm

Categories: Cancer, NATUROPATHY   Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Minerals Versus Cancer, Part II

Be Careful with Supplements

Encouraged by reports linking the mineral to cancer protection, people are buying – and taking – selenium supplements. In some Asia countries, they call selenium as the king of anti-cancer substances.  But, a few words of caution are in order.

At high doses, selenium can cause health problems. Fatigue and irritability, as well as brittleness or loss of hair, have been seen in patients suffering from toxic amounts of selenium. A research scientist exposed to too much selenium developed bronchitis and skin problems.

How Much is Too Much?

According to the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Research Council, a long term intake of 2400 to 3000 micrograms of selenium per day would be expected to cause a toxic reaction.

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1 comment - What do you think?  Posted by JavaHealth - March 2, 2010 at 12:15 pm

Categories: Cancer, NATUROPATHY   Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Minerals Versus Cancer

Wouldn’t it be great to have a “quick fix” for every disease – pill that would prevent or cure all health problems? No one would have to give a thought to diet, exercise, or other health habits.

It is an alluring idea. Some have even proposed that the quick fix already does exist – in the form of a mineral called selenium.

But the wishful thinking is a little premature. There is some evidence that the minerals in our food play a role in preventing cancer. More research is needed, though, before we can draw any conclusions.

The Minerals in Food

Food contains a wide range of minerals. We need some of them in large amounts. Other minerals are required in very small amounts.

Nutritionists refer to the minerals needed in large amounts as major minerals. Those that we need in small amounts are known as trace minerals or trace elements.

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2 comments - What do you think?  Posted by JavaHealth - February 27, 2010 at 2:28 pm

Categories: Cancer, NATUROPATHY   Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Vitamin C and Cancer

Beyond the Cancer Question

I would drink my orange juice and eat my green peppers even if  it weren’t  for research linking vitamin C to prevention of cancer.

Some of my reasons are the same ones that bolster the advice to eat more fruits and vegetables that supply carotene.  Like these plant foods rich in vitamin A, foods rich in vitamin C are also low in saturated fat and sodium.

What’s more, fruits and vegetables that contain vitamin C are cholesterol-free. And they provide small to moderate amounts of dietary fiber. Eaten in large amounts,  the fiber in these fruits and vegetables helps to lower blood cholesterol levels.

There is more. Vitamin C is rarely recognized for its role in iron absorption. Yet we have known for many years that vitamin C helps the body to absorb iron.

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2 comments - What do you think?  Posted by JavaHealth - January 30, 2010 at 1:23 pm

Categories: Cancer, NUTRITION   Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,