Posts Tagged ‘Canned foods’

Minerals versus Cancer, Part III

The Best Sources of Iron

If you are concerned about your iron intake, consider some of these sources:

* Lean meats and shellfish

* Whole grain or enriched cereals

* Dried apricots, prunes, or raisins

* Nuts and wheat germ

* Dried beans and peas

* Leafy green vegetables

Liver, especially pork liver, contains large amounts of iron. But it is also rich in cholesterol. Too many of us eat too much of cholesterol-containing foods. Egg yolk has a moderate iron content; it is high in cholesterol, too.

The iron in flesh foods, called heme iron, is best absorbed by the body. Yet studies have found no more iron-deficiency anemia among vegetarians than among meat eaters.

One possible explanation is vitamin C. It enhances absorption of the iron in foods. Vegetarians often consume more vitamin C than meat-eaters. The vitamin C may compensate for the absence of meat in their diets.

A Look at Lead

Lead has long been in the headlines. Lead poisoning has occurred too frequently among children – often from eating chips of old paint that contained lead.
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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by JavaHealth - March 3, 2010 at 5:17 pm

Categories: Cancer, NATUROPATHY   Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Vitamin C Helps You to Fight Cancer, Part III

Handle with Care

If you are nutrition-minded, you probably try not to lose nutrients in cooking.

With vitamin A, you don’t have to worry. It is tough stuff; pretty much indifferent to water, heat, and even long periods of storage. Vitamin A doesn’t dissolve in water, so it doesn’t leach into water used in cooking.

But vitamin C is very sensitive. Heat, light, and oxygen can do it in. In fact, some loss of the vitamin C in food just cannot be prevented.

With a little effort, though, losses of the vitamin can be kept to a minimum. Here are the rules:

  1. The sooner fresh foods can be used, the better. Vitamin C breaks down during storage.
  2. Try not to chop these foods finely all the time. The fewer pieces a food is cut into, the lower its exposure to oxygen, which destroys vitamin C.
  3. The vitamin C in cabbage, cantaloupe, squashes, and strawberries is especially unstable. The sooner they are eaten after cutting, the better.
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1 comment - What do you think?  Posted by JavaHealth - February 24, 2010 at 5:54 pm

Categories: Cancer, NUTRITION   Tags: , , , , , ,

Healthy Choice at The Market

What Do You Find at The Market?

You don’t have to be  a food scientist or carry a gram counter or calculator when you go to the market. Simply focus on selecting the freshest foods in their most natural state. And use your knowledge of basic nutritional principles. Here are a few tips.

Avoid heavily fatted meats. Free- range poultry and meats have been raised without the excessive use of antibiotics and other chemicals, and they’re recommended for the Blood Type Diet. Free-range means just that – that animals haven’t been penned in. Once you try free-range meat or poultry, you’ll see the difference. The flesh is leaner, the color and texture are richer, and there is very little fat. It’s possible to raise red meats that have fat and cholesterol level that are closer to those of the leaner poultry, but the meat may be less tender and flavorful by modern standards. The giant agribusinesses are still locked into the traditional notion that consumers want rich, high-fat meats. Our ancestors consumed rather lean game or domestic animals that graze on alfalfa and other grasses. Today’s meats are corn-fed, kept healthy with antibiotics, and prized for the tenderness of their meat and the marbling of their fat. Fortunately, some business are beginning to respond to the growing demand for lean, organic meat. If your market hasn’t caught on to the trend, be sure to let the manager know.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by Adhi - October 2, 2009 at 4:41 pm

Categories: LifeStyle, PUBLIC HEALTH   Tags: , , , , , , , , ,