Reflexology: Natural Way of Healing

My Story

In most Asia regions,  you can easily find the practice of reflexology everywhere. In attempt to heal my body from the second-time kidney stone (nephrolithiasis), I visited a medical doctor in Jakarta, who incorporates alternative therapy in his practice, in which he massaged me with reflexology method. He knows which area on my feet and hand should be pressed (massaged) that would  improve  the kidney and urinary tract condition.  Then, he didn’t give me  conventional medical prescription for kidney stone, but herbal prescription formulated to destroy the kidney stone in natural way. In a couple of  days he  massaged me again with reflexology. Each session of massage lasted for about 30 minutes. The goal of the reflexology massage is to improve the immune system and targeted illed body’s organ. I feel that this natural method of healing worked for my case.

What is Reflexology

Reflexology, also called zone therapy, is based on the notion that each body part is represented on the hands and feet and that pressing on specific areas on the hands or feet can have therapeutic effects in other parts of the body. Most proponents claim:

  • The body is divided into 10 longitudinal zones—five on each side of the body.
  • Each organ or part of the body is represented on the hands and feet;
  • The practitioner can diagnose abnormalities by feeling the hands or feet
  • Massaging or pressing each area can stimulate the flow of energy, blood, nutrients, and nerve impulses to the corresponding body zone and thereby relieve ailments in that zone.

The pathways postulated by reflexologists have not been anatomically demonstrated; and it is safe to assume that they do not exist. Similar rationales are used employed by iridologists (who imagine that eye markings represent disease throughout the body) and auricular acupuncturists who “map” body organs on the ear (a homunculus in the fetal position). The methodology is similar in both of these; and some commentators consider pressing on “acupuncture points” on the ear or elsewhere to be forms of reflexology, but most people refer to that as acupressure (“acupuncture without needles). The Reflexology Research Web site displays charts for foot and hand reflexology.

The fees I have seen advertised have ranged from $35 to $100 per session.

Most reflexologists claim that their procedures can relieve stress, which is probably correct with respect to everyday stress. However, many reflexologists describe stress in terms that do not correspond to scientific knowledge. Kevin and Barbara Kunz, for example, state:

The individual’s foot reflex areas reflect the individual’s overall state of tension that has resulted from a lifetime of adaption to stress. Stress cues in the feet are a road map to the reflexologist. Wherever it is found on a foot, it is a sign that stress and its effect have begun to accumulate in the corresponding parts of the body [1]

Many proponents claim that foot reflexology can cleanse the body of toxins, increase circulation, assist in weight loss, and improve the health of organs throughout the body. Others have reported success in treating earaches, anemia, bedwetting, bronchitis, convulsions in an infant, hemorrhoids, hiccups, deafness, hair loss, emphysema, prostate trouble, heart disease, overactive thyroid gland, kidney stones, liver trouble, rectal prolapse, undescended testicles, intestinal paralysis, cataracts, and hydrocephalus (a condition in which an excess of fluid surrounding the brain can cause pressure that damages the brain). Some claim to “balance energy and enhance healing elsewhere in the body.” [2] One practitioner has even claimed to have lengthened a leg that was an inch shorter than the other. There is no scientific support for these assertions.

Some reflexologists who deny that they diagnose or treat disease claim that the majority of health problems are stress-related and that they can help people by relieving the “stress” associated with various diseases or body organs [1]. This type of double-talk is similar to chiropractic claims that “subluxations” lower resistance to disease and that “adjusting” the spine to correct subluxations will improve health. All ten of the books I have inspected mention scores of health problems that reflexology has supposedly helped.

Pauline Wills, author of the Reflexology and Colour Therapy Workbook, teaches that colors can be applied to “areas where an abnormality has been diagnosed but which has produced no noticeable symptoms in the physical body.” She states that the application can be done by imagining colors transmitted through the practitioner’s hand or by Firstly, if the practitioner is sensitive to color, they can visualize it being projected or by using “reflexology crystal torch.” [8].

Find more useful information regarding reflexology for health in special weblog: Blog of Health.co.cc
References:

  1. Kunz K, Kunz B. The Complete Guide to Foot Reflexology (Revised). Albuquerque, NM: Reflexology Research, 1993.
  2. Sachs J, New York: Dell Publishing, 1997.Berger J. Reflexology: The A-Z Guide to Healing with Pressure Points.
  3. Benjamin. Eunice D. Ingham and the development of foot reflexology in the U.S. Massage Therapy Journal, Winter, 1989.
  4. Carter M. Helping Yourself With Foot Reflexology. Parker Publishing Company, 1969.
  5. Carter M. Hand Reflexology: Key to Perfect Health. West Nyack, N.Y. : Parker Publishing Company, 1975.
  6. Carter M. Body Reflexology: Healing At Your Fingertips. Parker Publishing Company, 1983.
  7. Spencer R. Mildred Carter announces a new health breakthrough! Blessed relief from 34 common ailments with new body reflexology. Parker Publishing Co., West Nyack, N.Y. Undated flyer received in 1993.
  8. Wills P. Integrating colour with reflexology. Positive Health Magazine, Jan/Feb 1997.