NUTRITION

The Right Vitamin A to Prevent Cancer, Part II

Color is the Clue

Color is sometimes the key to judging the carotene in fruits and vegetables. Deep green and yellow vegetables. Deep green and yellow vegetables are usually very good sources of vitamin A. But lighter versions of the same foods are not. For example:

  • Green asparagus is rich in vitamin A. The bleached white asparagus has about one-tenth as much!
  • Romaine lettuce provides  four times as much vitamin A as iceberg lettuce.
  • Yellow corn has more vitamin A than white corn.
  • Green beans have more vitamin A than wax beans.

Here is my favorite piece of vitamin A trivia: frozen chopped broccoli has one-third more vitamin A than the frozen spears. I am willing to bet that the leaves in the chopped version make the difference. Their deep green color is a sure sign of vitamin A!

Though fruits and vegetables supply almost half of our vitamin A, other foods do have significant amounts. Meat, poultry, and fish provide about one-fourth of the vitamin A in our diet; diary products give another 15 % or so. Eggs and other foods supply a little less than 10 %.

But it is not known whether the vitamin A in most animal foods has any value in cancer prevention. That is why the Committee on Diet, Nutrition, and Cancer restricted its recommendations to fruits and vegetables. But in this regard, however, I suggest you to learn more about the potency of vitamin A in animal sources to fight cancer posted in BlogOfHealth.co.cc.

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1 comment - What do you think?  Posted by JavaHealth - February 16, 2010 at 9:43 pm

Categories: Cancer, NUTRITION   Tags: , ,

The Right Vitamin A to Prevent Cancer

Vitamin A vs. Cancer

From all over the world have come the most exciting findings ever reported about vitamin A. More than a dozen studies have linked diets rich in vitamin A to a surprising amount of protection against some forms of cancer.

In Chicago, scientists found only two cases of lung cancer among 500 men, including some smokers, who eat many fruits and vegetables rich in vitamin A. That was only one-seventh as many lung cancer cases as were found in 500 men who ate few of these foods.

And in Norway, the findings were no different. Men who ate many vegetables rich in vitamin A had only one-third as much lung cancer as those eating little of these foods.

In Japan, the story was the same. Researches found 30 percent fewer cases of lung cancer among people who ate vegetables rich in vitamin A every day. The daily vegetable eaters also had lower rates of stomach cancer.

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6 comments - What do you think?  Posted by JavaHealth - February 13, 2010 at 11:07 am

Categories: Cancer, NUTRITION   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Vitamin C and Cancer

Beyond the Cancer Question

I would drink my orange juice and eat my green peppers even if  it weren’t  for research linking vitamin C to prevention of cancer.

Some of my reasons are the same ones that bolster the advice to eat more fruits and vegetables that supply carotene.  Like these plant foods rich in vitamin A, foods rich in vitamin C are also low in saturated fat and sodium.

What’s more, fruits and vegetables that contain vitamin C are cholesterol-free. And they provide small to moderate amounts of dietary fiber. Eaten in large amounts,  the fiber in these fruits and vegetables helps to lower blood cholesterol levels.

There is more. Vitamin C is rarely recognized for its role in iron absorption. Yet we have known for many years that vitamin C helps the body to absorb iron.

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2 comments - What do you think?  Posted by JavaHealth - January 30, 2010 at 1:23 pm

Categories: Cancer, NUTRITION   Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Fats: What You Should Know about It

Food Fats

Food fats or dietary fats are white or yellowish greasy material, found in both animals and plants. Pure fat lacks color, odor, and taste, and it exists both as a liquid and as a solid.

During digestion, fat is broken down in the duodenum (the first part of the small intestine, just past the stomach) to fatty acids and glycerol. As a food, its primary value and importance are as a fuel – a source of body energy. It is the most concentrated food we have, and it possesses more than twice the caloric value of carbohydrates or protein. Every ounce of fat has the same value as every other – whether it is an ounce of butter or an ounce of cottonseed oil. One type of fat, however, may be more easily assimilated, or absorbed, thus more accessible, than another. In  northern America, the fats eaten most often are in the form of eggs, margarine, butter, meat, cream, nuts, and such oils as olive oil and vegetable oil.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by JavaHealth - October 24, 2009 at 1:59 am

Categories: NATUROPATHY, NUTRITION   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

F i s h: Source of Protein and Omega-3

Fish as a source of  Omega-3

Entire cultures have survived on diets of fish. Civilizations grew along the shores of the sea and the banks of rivers. The oceans, seas, lakes, rivers, and streams often provided an incredible bounty.

In the human diet, fish are a source of high quality protein, essential vitamins and minerals but, above all, a virtually unique, rich source of omega-3 (or n-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) sometimes termed highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA). This page summarises the origins of omega-3 PUFA in fish, the increasingly important role of aquaculture in the provision of fish for human consumption, and the major issues currently facing aquaculture focusing on sustainability, driven by the urgent need to replace traditional fish oil and meal in formulated diets, and safety, driven by the requirement to reduce feed-derived contaminants.
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2 comments - What do you think?  Posted by JavaHealth - October 16, 2009 at 6:53 pm

Categories: NUTRITION   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Coffee: No.1 Source of Antioxidants

Coffee is  good for your health !

Coffee provides more than just a morning jolt; that steaming cup of java or mandheling  is also the number one source of antioxidants in some countries and,  particularly, in the U.S. diet, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Scranton (Pa.). Their study was described at the 230th national meeting of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.

“Americans get more of their antioxidants from coffee than any other dietary source. Nothing else comes close,” says study leader Joe Vinson, Ph.D., a chemistry professor at the university. Although fruits and vegetables are generally promoted as good sources of antioxidants, the new finding is surprising because it represents the first time that coffee has been shown to be the primary source from which most Americans get their antioxidants, Vinson says. Both caffeinated and decaf versions appear to provide similar antioxidant levels, he adds.

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8 comments - What do you think?  Posted by JavaHealth - September 25, 2009 at 8:12 am

Categories: Coffee, NUTRITION   Tags: , , , , , , , ,

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