PUBLIC HEALTH

Enzyme Alkaline Phosphatase: Where Blood Type Meets Digestion

Your unique blood type is a principal thing for your health; therefore, never ignore it’s role for your health. Below, I’d like to inform you what Dr. Peter D’Adamo, the real health guru, say about the health of  your digesting system.

No single diet theory can address all aspects of our individuality, and only a fool would claim that soy, red meat, grains, coconut oil or anything else is universally good or universally bad for everyone.

For example, people who are blood type O appear to derive significant benefit from a diet including hormone and antibiotic free meats and poultry. There is a very basic physiologic reason for this: those with type O blood have almost three times the levels of an enzyme in their intestines called ‘intestinal alkaline phosphatase’ (IAP). [1]. This enzyme performs two very important functions in the body. First, IAP splits dietary cholesterol into smaller fragments, allowing for their proper breakdown. Second, IAP enhances the absorption of calcium from the diet. Now you’d think this was cutting-edge, late-breaking news since it is obviously of tremendous interest in these nutrigenomic times. However, the first observations were made over four decades ago.[2]

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by adhihart - November 26, 2011 at 1:26 pm

Categories: Blood Type Diet, PUBLIC HEALTH   Tags: , ,

The Flu: Blood Type Differences and the Power of Elderberry

While the versatility of elderberry and these other berries is incredible, this article is going to limit itself primarily to a focus on elderberry’s most well known use—as a remedy in the common flu.

Many medical experts consider the influenza virus (cause of the flu) to be the most dangerous virus in the world. Several times in past history, this virus has been responsible for killing huge numbers of people within a 1 to 2 year period. As an example, the Spanish flu (type A(H1N1)) of 1918-19 killed about 500,000 people in the U.S. and at least 20 million people worldwide. In 1957-58, the Asian flu (type A(H2N2)) resulted in 70,000 deaths in the US and in 1968-69, the Hong-Kong flu (type (A(H3N2)) killed 34,000 in the U.S.

What is the Flu?

Let’s pause here and take a moment to get a clearer picture of what the flu really is. Terminology and language can be fickle and non-specific masters, and so the common day-to-day use of the term flu has evolved to often encompass anything from a common cold to a true flu. Read more…

1 comment - What do you think?  Posted by adhihart - November 24, 2011 at 10:34 am

Categories: NATUROPATHY, PUBLIC HEALTH   Tags: , , ,

How to Avoid SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder)

It is the end of 2010, and I suggest you to learn from Dr.Ann Quasarano regarding seasonal affective disorder. I believe her following suggestion benefits you to anticipate your health in facing the change of the year. As you know, almost all part in the world is experiencing the extreme change of climate, as what’s is happening in my region, Indonesia (South East Asia).

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) affects million of people everywhere, about half a million people in the US only, each year. It’s thought that there are many more cases, including those who have a milder form of SAD, who don’t seek treatment. Often called the winter blues, SAD sufferers become depressed when the winter season rolls around. Below are a few suggestions for avoiding SAD this winter:

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2 comments - What do you think?  Posted by JavaHealth - December 13, 2010 at 12:31 pm

Categories: Blood Type Diet, PUBLIC HEALTH   Tags: , , , ,

Study Links Blood Type and Fertility

This time,  I would like to share with you the latest health study that links blood type and fertility.

In a study presented at the American Society of Reproductive Medicine Conference in Denver, the researchers at Yale and Albert Einstein College of Medicine measured levels of a chemical called follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in 560 women undergoing fertility treatments and found that those women with type O blood had chemical signs linked to low egg numbers.

The control group had an average age of 35 and those with O blood type were found to have higher levels of FSH – almost twice the levels of women with the blood type A antigen. This is significant as high levels of FSH are thought to be an indicator that a woman’s ovarian egg reserve is diminishing – which can reduce a woman’s chances of conception once a woman reaches her 30s and 40s.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by JavaHealth - December 6, 2010 at 10:55 pm

Categories: Blood Type Diet, PUBLIC HEALTH   Tags: ,

Enhance Your Immune System

As the autumn days become cool and crisp, it reminds us that we need to step up our immune boosting protocol and get our bodies into “fight mode.” Soon cold and flu season will be upon us and by taking a few preventive measures you will reduce your chances of catching those nasty winter bugs.

  • We all know that immunity begins in our gut. By eating foods that are right for your type, you are taking the most important step to staying healthy. Step up your consumption of beneficial foods and remove any foods to be avoided  from your diet.
  • Stress lowers immunity. We can’t completely avoid stress, but take a few moments to slow down – find 10 minutes a day to just sit and close your eyes, do some deep breathing or meditation.
  • Exercise boosts immunity! Find an exercise that is right for you and stick with it. I love going for a brisk walk in the cool fall evenings as the sun is setting, it’s a great way to wind down the day and enjoy the beauty of the season.
  • Read more…

2 comments - What do you think?  Posted by JavaHealth - October 5, 2010 at 9:11 am

Categories: Blood Type Diet, NATUROPATHY, PUBLIC HEALTH   Tags: , , , ,

Sick Building Syndrome

The term sick building syndrome (SBS) is used to describe situations in which building occupants experience acute health and comfort effects that appear to be linked to time spent in a building, but no specific illness or cause can be identified. The complaints may be localized in a particular room or zone, or may be widespread throughout the building. In contrast, the term building related illness (BRI) is used when symptoms of diagnosable illness are identified and can be attributed directly to airborne building contaminants.

A 1984 WHO Committee report suggested that up to 30 percent of new and remodeled buildings worldwide may be the subject of excessive complaints related to indoor air quality (IAQ). Often this condition is temporary, but some buildings have long-term problems. Frequently, problems result when a building is operated or maintained in a manner that is inconsistent with its original design or prescribed operating procedures. Sometimes indoor air problems are a result of poor building design or occupant activities.
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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by Adhi - August 29, 2010 at 1:08 pm

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Sinusitis and Your Blood Type

As usual, I would like to share with you the latest powerful information from Peter D’Adamo, ND, MIfHI regarding sinusitis.

The primary function of the sinuses is to warm, moisten, and filter the air in the nasal cavity. The sinuses  also play a role in our ability to vocalize certain sounds. Sinusitis, which is common in the winter, may last for months or years of inadequately treated. Although colds are the most common cause of acute sinusitis, people with allergies may also be predisposed to developing sinusitis. Allergies can trigger inflammation of the sinuses and nasal mucous linings. This inflammation prevents the sinus cavities from clearing out bacteria, and increases the chance of developing secondary bacterial sinusitis.

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94 comments - What do you think?  Posted by JavaHealth - August 4, 2010 at 12:04 pm

Categories: Blood Type Diet, PUBLIC HEALTH   Tags: ,

Chocolate is Excellent for Cardiovascular Health

Chocolate is well-known as a powerful aphrodisiac to enhance your sexual ability. Furthermore, the largest observational study so far to examine the association between chocolate consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease has found that those who ate the most chocolate–around 7.5 g per day–had a 39% lower risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke than individuals who ate almost no chocolate (1.7 g per day) [1].

Cocoa Content is the Key

Lead author Dr. Brian Buijsse (German Institute of Human Nutrition, Nuthetal, Germany) told heartwire: “This shows that habitual consumption of chocolate is related to a lower risk of heart disease and stroke that is partly explained by blood-pressure reduction. The risk reduction is stronger for stroke than for MI, which is logical because it appears that chocolate and cocoa have a pronounced effect on BP [blood pressure], and BP is a higher risk factor for stroke than for MI.” Buijsse and colleagues report their findings online March 31, 2010 in the European Heart Journal.

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2 comments - What do you think?  Posted by JavaHealth - May 1, 2010 at 11:52 am

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Who Say Appendix Has No Benefit?

Appendix Benefits Your Health

Appendix, the common name for the vermiform appendix – a wormlike sac approximately 3.5 inches long attached to the cecum (the beginning of the large intestine). The appendix is called a vestigal organ – that is to say, it no longer has a function in the body, being simply a vestige of an organ in an ancestral species. It is usually on the right side of the body in the groin area. Substances in the intestine may find their way into the appendix and then may be removed by the involuntary contractions of the abdominal muscles (peristalsis).

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2 comments - What do you think?  Posted by Adhi - February 7, 2010 at 6:15 am

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The Roles of Saturated Fats for Human Health

The Truth about Fats

The following nutrient-rich traditional fats have nourished healthy population groups for thousands of years:

For Cooking

  • Butter
  • Tallow and suet from beef and lamb
  • Lard from pigs
  • Chicken, goose and duck fat
  • Coconut, palm and palm kernel oils

For Salads

  • Extra virgin olive oil (also OK for cooking)
  • Expeller-expressed sesame and peanut oils
  • Expeller-expressed flax oil (in small amounts)

For Fat-Soluble Vitamins

  • Fish liver oils such as cod liver oil (preferable to fish oils, which do not provide fat-soluble vitamins, can cause an overdose of unsaturated fatty acids and usually come from farmed fish.)

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by JavaHealth - October 28, 2009 at 1:12 am

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